Lifestyle travelling like a boss

Lifestyle travellers often engage in free lance jobs, entrepreneurship, or own companies, but some do not work at all.

In preference to “settling down” with a family or other traditional life goals, some lifestyle travellers can actually develop a career or even start a family whilst “on the road”.

Younger people often pursue a year or two of travelling, called a gap year, before settling down, returning to university, or otherwise resuming a “regular” lifestyle. This is known as backpacking. A very small minority, however, follow the path of a lifestyle traveller, as a path for a major part or even all of their adult lives.

Some lifestyle travellers purchase a sailboat, which provides a place to live and a mode of transportation at the same time. Others rely on cheap berths on cargo ships or modern aviation to take them from destination to destination, purchasing, for example, inexpensive standby or open-jaw tickets to meet the flexibilities of their schedule. Others, according to their budget and way to generate income, travel with a van, or in rare instances have their own airplane, or even continue backpacking.

Lifestyle travelers network, cocreating the necessary conditions for the self-sustainability of the lifestyle travel.

Lifestyle travellers, as opposed to shorter-term backpackers, often spend at least three to six months in their various destinations, usually to cut down on costs but also to get a fuller experience from each new culture they explore. Stays of two, five or even ten years are not uncommon, at the far end of which the only distinction between being an expatriate and a lifestyle traveller is the certainty for the latter that one is leaving.

What Everybody Needs to Know About Coffee

Coffee is a brewed beverage prepared from the roasted seeds of several species of an evergreen shrub of the genus Coffea.

The two most common sources of coffee beans are the highly regarded Coffea arabica, and the “robusta” form of the hardier Coffea canephora. The latter is resistant to the coffee leaf rust (Hemileia vastatrix), but has a more bitter taste. Coffee plants are cultivated in more than 70 countries, primarily in equatorial Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Once ripe, coffee “berries” are picked, processed, and dried to yield the seeds inside. The seeds are then roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor, before being ground and brewed to create coffee.

Coffee is slightly acidic (pH 5.0–5.1) and can have a stimulating effect on humans because of its caffeine content. It is one of the most popular drinks in the world. It can be prepared and presented in a variety of ways. The effect of coffee on human health has been a subject of many studies; however, results have varied in terms of coffee’s relative benefit. The majority of recent research suggests that moderate coffee consumption is benign or mildly beneficial in healthy adults. However, coffee can worsen the symptoms of conditions such as anxiety, largely due to the caffeine and diterpenes it contains.

Coffee cultivation first took place in southern Arabia; the earliest credible evidence of coffee-drinking appears in the middle of the 15th century in the Sufi shrines of Yemen. In East Africa and Yemen, coffee was used in native religious ceremonies. As these ceremonies conflicted with the beliefs of the Christian church, the Ethiopian Church banned the secular consumption of coffee until the reign of Emperor Menelik II.

The beverage was also banned in Ottoman Turkey during the 17th century for political reasons and was associated with rebellious political activities in Europe.

An important export commodity, coffee was the top agricultural export for twelve countries in 2004, and it was the world’s seventh-largest legal agricultural export by value in 2005. Green (unroasted) coffee is one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world. Some controversy is associated with coffee cultivation and its impact on the environment. Consequently, organic coffee is an expanding market.

Man’s best friend

Before the evolution of wolf into dog, it is posited that Man and wolf worked together hunting game.

Wolves were the superior tracker but man was the superior killer, thus wolves would lead man to the prey and man would leave some of the meat to the wolves. This working relationship eventually led to the evolution of dogs, although there is controversy as to the exact nature of that transition.

Some say wolves evolved naturally into dogs, wherein the wolves that worked best with humans slowly began to assimilate and pass their domesticated genes down. Others say that humans took wolf pups and raised them to be domesticated. Either way, man and dog formed a working relationship. Previous to the 19th century, dogs, other than lap dogs, were largely functional. Used for activities such as hunting, watching and guarding, language describing the dog often reflected these positions within society.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary,

In the oldest proverbs and phrases dogs are rarely depicted as faithful or as man’s best friend, but as vicious, ravening, or watchful.

Beginning in the 18th century, multiplying in the 19th and flourishing in the 20th century, language and attitudes towards dogs began to shift. Possibly, this societal shift can be attributed to discovery of the rabies vaccine in 1869.

The earliest citation of the actual word choice is traced to a poem printed in the The New-York Literary Journal, Volume 4, 1821:

  • The faithful dog – why should I strive
  • To speak his merits, while they live
  • In every breast, and man’s best friend
  • Does often at his heels attend.

In 1870 Warrensburg, Missouri, George Graham Vest represented a farmer suing for damages after his dog, Old Drum, was shot and killed. Vest’s closing speech included this quote, “The one absolutely unselfish friend that a man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him and the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous is his dog.” In 1958, a statue of Old Drum was erected on the Johnson County Courthouse lawn containing a summation of Vest’s closing speech, “A man’s best friend is his dog.”